Be Aware of these Real Estate Scams

Real estate professionals have enough to keep track of in their day-to-day lives and shouldn’t have to worry about malicious scammers trying to catch them in a distracted moment.
Unfortunately, RealtorsĀ® must remain vigilant of scammers to protect themselves and their clients. In today’s market, deception can be hiding behind situations even when they don’t seem “too good to be true”.
Take a look at the types of scams facing real estate pros today. Some of what’s below are specific case studies, and some are generalized. All deserve attention as you work to remain safe from these threats.
REMEMBER: IF YOU ARE THE VICTIM OF A SCAM, YOUR FIRST CALL SHOULD ALWAYS BE TO LAW ENFORCEMENT.
IF ANY PART OF A CRIME WAS COMMITTED OVER THE INTERNET, PLEASE FILE A REPORT WITH THE FBI’S INTERNET CRIME COMPLAINT CENTER.

Listing for a Deceased Individual

A listing agent recently reported that they were scammed into listing a property for someone who was not who they claimed to be. The owner of the property passed away and the listing agreement was signed via Dotloop using the deceased’s name. When out-of-the-ordinary situations like this occur, always go the extra mile to investigate claims that may seem odd.

Cash Investor Helping Low-Income Buyer

A scam artist recently acted as an all-cash investor, supposedly interested in helping low income buyers find a home for a $5,000 down payment. Thankfully, when the buyer tried to wire $5,000 to the scammer, the recipientā€™s account was flagged as fraudulent.

"I Need You to Buy Some Gift Cards" Text Scam

Scam artists routinely send fraudulent texts and emails, pretending to be the recipient’s employer, a colleague, or the President of HAAR. They can’t talk on the phone and can only communicate via text. It’s a scam.

Facebook & Craigslist Rental, Listing Scams

Scammers like to post rentals – or sometimes homes for sale – on marketplace websites like Craigslist, Facebook marketplace, and more. They usually can only communicate through text messages and ask for money up front. If a property owner or seller can’t meet you in person, it’s a scam.